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I am running a little intern program and I’ve got the first wave of them coming this week.  The nature of the agreement and our studio space comes with some limitations that I’ve had to work around.  I have a good plan in place for this wave of students but I wanted to pick the community’s collective brain for some potential future ideas.

These are a mix of video/audio production students ages 16-19, they are all pretty interested in general but some likely haven’t done anything with sound effects before.  I can’t really get too messy and I can’t get too dangerous.  For perspective, I was told no on smashing fruits, veggies etc. for a gore library.

I’m trying to keep this short but I can always give you guys more details if it helps, really just looking for any potentially cool ideas.  It’s also worth mentioning that the libraries being created will eventually be available in some form.  So share cool ideas, but also share stuff that you’d maybe want to have recorded.

This is the first time I’ve run the program and if it goes well, I will be able to justify a bigger budget and also have some ground to stand on when I want to push my limitations.

Edit/Update:

Our first day went extremely well. We started out with an open discussion about sound design to find out what they know and go over some examples. I introduced my sound library project to them and our first assigned theme is Robots/Machines. We started with a word web to brainstorm ideas for what kind of sounds robots/machines can make. From there we moved into talking about props and what to record to get some of these sounds. We do not have a lot of in house props so this prompted a discussion on what we can do to overcome the limitations.

We spent some time recording and trying different performances with what we had. Then I showed them a short animation of a robot – we took a handful of our sounds, edited them and did some very basic processing (pitching, looping, etc.). We created footsteps, servo movements to match animation and a few other details. They enjoyed the process of brainstorming and recording but the whole thing clicked in when they were able to see the sound to picture. It warms my heart to say that the most difficult part of getting them to cooperate was trying to get them away from the desk so we could strike our session for the day.